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  Slovenia

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Basic information

Year of approval of the
SD strategy and updates

Slovenia's Development Strategy (SDS) was adopted by the Government in 2005 for the period 2005 – 2013 and includes all three dimensions of SD, therefore, it is also understood as the country’s NSDS. It has been the key mechanism for defining sustainable development goals and targets. SDS 2005-13 focuses primarily on economic development, but social and environmental issues are also extensively addressed. SDS defines four key development goals: (i) the economic development goal – to reach the average level of economic development in the EU in 10 years1 ; (ii) the social development goal – to improve the quality of life and welfare; (iii) the intergenerational and sustainable development goal – to apply the principles of sustainability across all areas of development, including sustained population growth; and (iv) Slovenia’s development goal in the international environment – to become an internationally distinctive and renowned country. SDS also identifies implementation of measures to achieve sustainable development as one of its five priorities (A competitive economy and faster economic growth; Efficient use of knowledge for economic development and high-quality jobs; An efficient and less costly state; A modern welfare state; Integration of measures to achieve sustainable development).

Every year a Development Report presents a detailed account of progress in meeting the SDS objectives. In 2010, Slovenia’s Statistical Office published a list of sustainable development indicators to complement monitoring of the SDS implementation. Initially, a revision of the Development Strategy has been planned for 2009 and with the involvement of the National Council for Sustainable Development (NCSD).

The revision of the strategy started in 2008  with a ‘scenario-building exercise’. The process was moderated by an external international consultancy between April-June 2008. One of the main objectives was to identify gaps of the current strategy and reach a consensus about priority measures for the future. At the end of the scenario building process, the participants at different levels helped to prepare a set of three scenarios, which are illustrations to plausible futures and their stories provide an opportunity to assess the plans and strategies under any scenario. Participants formulated three distinct scenarios: Clueless, Green Oasis and Chameleon. As a tool to use the stories in the future a simple scheme of branching points is included together with a comprehensive scheme which places the three scenarios in relation to each other and attempts to illustrate their differences, commonalities and correlations. The set of the scenarios explore and test existing plans and strategies while at the same time also provide a unique “lens” through which information, events and development can be assessed and understood.

The new Slovenia’s Development Strategy 2014-2020 is under preparation.

Type of SD strategy

NSDS covers all three dimensions of SD plus culture.

Lead ministry/institution in
the SD strategy process

Government Office for Development and European Cohesion Policy and Institute of Macroeconomic Analysis and Development

The Government Office for Development and European CohesionPolicy (GODC) is the lead institution for the Slovenia’s development Strategy.

The Institute of Macroeconomic Analysis and Development of the Republic of Slovenia (IMAD) is an independent government office. IMAD monitors the realisation of SDS in its publication Development Report.

Link to the SD strategy
document

'Slovenia's Development Strategy' (2005) 

The full list(s) of NSDS objectives as identified by a study commissioned by Eurostat can be downloaded here: Development Strategyobjectives (2005).

Further information about
the SD strategy process

The OECD Environmental Performance Review for Slovenia, 2012

 

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National Implementation of 2030 Agenda for SD

Slovenia with its National Development Strategy 2030 (NDS 2030) sets a new strategic framework for national development, which is based on the principles of sustainable development. The document will build on the vision of Slovenia in 2050 and is linked to the commitments made in Agenda 2030.

Preparation of the strategy is coordinated by the Government Office for Development and European Cohesion Policy. In accordance with the principles of sustainable development, the document will be based on the recognition that ecosystem capacity of the environment sets boundary conditions to development and sustainable development only provide a good life for present and future generations.

The response of the Republic of Slovenia to Agenda 2030 and the preparation of the national development strategy until 2030 are parallel, closely intertwined processes that are distinctly horizontal and require a comprehensive approach of the government and the active involvement of stakeholders. The adoption of the document by the government is expected in 2017.

In preparation of the strategy, Slovenia works closely with the OECD experts and uses relevant OECD tools, e.g. the OECD Pilot Study on Measuring the Distances to the SDGs targets – Figure: Slovenia’s starting position on SDG targets:

In absence of national development strategy, the highest level policy document is Partnership Agreement between Slovenia and the European Commission for the period 2014 – 2020. Sustainable development is defined as the central guiding principle in the preparation of programmes for the implementation of EU funds, whereby Slovenia will promote measures facilitating a shift to a low-carbon resource-efficient society that will provide prosperity for its citizens. Funding will target measures that enhance social cohesion, reduce poverty risk and strengthen social equality, while contributing to solutions that address demographic challenges. By investing in measures to raise the level of material and energy efficiency, climate change mitigation and adaptation and pollution prevention, the country seeks to ensure the long-term environmental sustainability of a society which respects its own culture and cultural heritage and recognises the richness of multi-culture. The investments will pursue a principle of efficiency that strengthens the value of economic capital, natural and cultural capital, and social capital.

In addition to the process of drafting the National Development Strategy, several sectoral or horizontal strategies, programmes and instruments, committed to pursue various combinations of SDGs, are being implemented or are under preparation. Among them, a new National Environmental Action Programme (NEAP) up to 2020 and beyond, prepared by the Ministry of the Environment and Spatial Planning, will be based on the vision proposed by the 7th Environment Action Programme of the EU: “In 2050, we live well, within the planet's ecological limits.” The background document for the NEAP is a comprehensive report on the state of the environment in Slovenia prepared by the Ministry of the Environment and Spatial Planning in 2016. The findings reveal that the state of the environment doesn’t depend only on local practice but it is also affected by global pressures that are growing faster than in the past mainly due to economic growth, population growth and changing consumption and production patterns. Therefore traditional measures of “emission control” are replaced by an awareness of the limited space and natural resources, of the importance of ecosystem services for the conservation and welfare of the people and that negative impacts of our consumption and production patterns cannot be shifted onto the shoulders of other regions. Environmental efforts are moving in the direction of low-carbon society, the circular economy, resilient ecosystems, and sustainable macroeconomic development models. To achieve the 2050 vision, environmental protection policy cannot be implemented in isolation from policies in other sectors such as agriculture, transport, energy, tourism. It is inextricably linked to the broader economic and social development.

One of the key horizontal programmes that primarily integrates environmental and economic goals of sustainable development is the Framework programme for a transition to a green economy adopted by the government in October 2015 and coordinated by the Office of the Prime Minister. It includes government action in many areas, including the sustainable management of resources (water, waste, physical space, protected natural areas, forests, wood, opportunity for greater social inclusion), greening of the economy with smart specialisation strategy, the promotion of green jobs and the skills and knowledge necessary for them to flourish, green financial reform and the reform of green public procurement, sustainable urban development and sustainable transport policy, green farming practices.  To support implementation of the framework programme, the government has established the Partnership for Slovenia’s green economy with interested parties from the economy, non-governmental organizations and local communities.

Among sectoral instruments for SD one of the most successful is the Green Scheme of Slovenian Tourism – GSST – SLOVENIA GREEN, the central mechanism in developing and promoting sustainable tourism in Slovenia coordinated by the Slovenian Tourist Board (STO). With the Green Scheme of Slovenian Tourism the STO is following Slovenian strategical guidelines for sustainable development, policies of European Union and a wider sustainable path on a global scale. By implementing it, they are in line with upcoming Strategy of sustainable growth of tourism for 2017-2021 and all sustainable development dimensions, from environment and economy, to society and culture. As the crown of all these efforts, Slovenia was the first country to receive the Green Country title by gathering 96 out of 100 points in line with the Global Destination criteria, and became a role model for the rest of the world.

 

Leading Ministry and
respective unit

Government Office for Development and European Cohesion Policy

Other ministries involved

Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food, Ministry of Culture, Ministry of Defence, Ministry of Economic Development and Technology, Ministry of Education, Science and Sport, Ministry of the Environment and Spatial Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Infrastructure, Ministry of the Interior, Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Labour, Family, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities, Ministry of Public Administration, Office of the Government of the Republic of Slovenia for Slovenians Abroad, Office of the Prime Minister, Institute of Macroeconomic Analysis and Development, Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia

Main contact point for the
implementation process

Timotej ŠOOŠ, Project Lead, Slovenia Development Strategy

Government Office for Development and European Cohesion Policy

E: timotej.soos@gov.si

T: +386 1 400 3557
M: +386 31 357 744

W: http://www.svrk.gov.si/en/

 

FOR THE ENVIRONMENT AND ESD:

Dr. Darja PICIGA,  Secretary

Environment Directorate

Ministry of the Environment and Spatial Planning

E: darja.piciga@gov.si

T: +386 (0) 1 478 7117

M: +386 (0) 41 399 715

W: www.mop.gov.si

 

FOR THE GREEN ECONOMY:

Tadej Slapnik, Head of the Interdepartmental Working Group for the Transition to a Green Economy and a State Secretary

Office of the Prime Minister

E: tadej.slapnik@gov.si

T: +386 1 478 1908

M: + 386 (0)31 348 930

W: http://www.vlada.si/teme_in_projekti/prehod_v_zeleno_gospodarstvo/

 

Links to main websites/
documents on national
implementation of the
2030 Agenda and SDGs

www.Slovenija2050.si

 

Voluntary National Reviews

https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/16313Slovenia.pdf

 

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Mechanisms of Vertical Integration

National — sub-national linkages

In the preparation of the NSDS, the National Council for Sustainable Development (NCSD) was involved. Two representatives of the sub-national levels participated in the NCSD. The NCSD organised five topic-specific discussions, including one with regional and local representatives. The 9-member Council for SD, established in 2011, comprised 2 representatives of local communities. The draft of the strategy for the transition to a low-carbon society (presented in section Mechanisms of Horizontal Integration) includes “local and regional initiative” as one of 4 horizontal strategies.

Regarding implementation, the Structural Funds/Cohesion Funds were the main focus of Slovenia. In this context, SD was addressed in regional development programmes. There is an ad-hoc involvement of regional bodies in this process, mainly in cohesion fund programming.

Generally, there is a link between the objectives of the NSDS and the regional programmes. On the one hand, this is fostered by a coordination mechanism in the Office for Regional Development in the Government (since April 2012: Regional Development and European Territorial Cooperation Directorate within the Ministry of Economic Development and Technology, since March 2014: Government Office for Development and European Cohesion Policy) that coordinates multi-level governance issues with national bodies and the Regional Development Councils. On the other hand, a decree that is mandatory for all political levels outlines that in development policy, the principles of the NSDS need to be taken into account (Art. 3). Another article defines the context of a development plan and refers to SEA and policy coherence in establishment of the plan.

Regarding implementation, the EU Structural Funds/Cohesion Funds were the main focus of Slovenia. In this context, SD was addressed in regional development programmes. There is an ad-hoc involvement of regional bodies in this process, mainly in cohesion fund programming and management.

According to the OECD Environmental Performance Review for Slovenia, the considerable autonomy enjoyed by municipalities, and the absence of regional administrative level, have resulted in an important environmental governance gap between national and local levels. Therefore one of the Review’s key recommendations is to strengthen the oversight by the responsible Ministry of local spatial planning, and provide incentives for municipalities to develop joint regional spatial plans.

EU linkages

The renewed EU Strategy for Sustainable Development (EU SDS) that was adopted in June 2006 foresees that Member States bi-annually report about how they address the priorities of the EU SDS. Slovenia has published its first national report on implementing the EU SDS in summer 2007.

The Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia in cooperation with EUROSTAT, some Member States and the National Council for Sustainable Development has undertaken a 2-year project aimed at compiling and promoting tailored-made sustainable development indicators for Slovenia. The sustainable development indicators web-page waslaunched and a printed brochure made available  2010.

 

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Mechanisms of Horizontal Integration

Inter-ministerial coordination was established during the preparation of the NSDS. Moreover, the National Council for SD (NCSD) fostered cross-sectoral coordination. NCSD was established in 2003 as the consultative body of the Government in 2003, chaired by the Minister for Regional Development. According to the Government decision of 14 June 2007, the NCSD was chaired by the Minister for Development and co-chaired by the Minister of Environment and Spatial Planning and by the Minister of Local Self-Government and Regional Policy. It was composed of 34 members, comprising 9 representatives of Government offices and 25 representatives of civil society. In March 2011, the Government appointed a new Council for Sustainable Development comprised of 9 distinguished experts from the main stakeholder groups, with Government Office of Climate Change as its secretariat. In May 2012, the new Government abolished the Council for Sustainable Development.

During the period November 2009 – March 2012, the newly established Government Office of Climate Change partially undertook the coordinating role in the area of sustainable development. The office reported directly to the Prime Minister, and was charged with the horizontal coordination of policies and measured related to climate change, and also with representing Slovenia in international negotiations. One of its main tasks was drafting the Strategy for the transition of Slovenia to a low-carbon society by 2050 - the low-carbon society being defined as a society (or economy), of which the greenhouse gas emissions are lower than the absorption capacity of the global ecosystem, and at the same time based on the principles of sustainable development. The Climate Change Office submitted first draft in September 2011 to public consultation (Executive Summary in English), and published the second draft on March 31, 2012, on the last day of its operation. The Office of Climate Change was abolished according to the Act amending Public Administration Act (ZDU-1F), and the area of climate change was shifted to the Ministry of Agriculture and the Environment.

Slovenia was among the first countries that have drawn a comprehensive strategy for a transition to a low carbon society. The purpose of the transition to a low carbon society is the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a new quality of economic, social and environmental development. The strategy proposed the vision of Slovenia in 2050 as a highly integrated and inclusive society with an excellent business sector and a high quality of life, space and natural environment. This vision is reflective of a 2008 scenario building exercise which has informed processes since then. The Strategic Approach focuses on reducing emissions through green growth (including green tax reform), adaptation and supporting horizontal strategies (innovation and education, local and regional initiative, awareness and communication, active role in international community) that enable the preparation and implementation of other measures. The draft strategy further sets objectives and policies for 13 specific thematic areas: Energy, Transport, Low carbon technologies, Buildings, Industry, Services, Agriculture, Solid waste, Spatial planning, Forests, sinks, biodiversity, Waters, Health, Natural disasters. Across these thematic areas, a number of sectors and technologies are defined that are already or should be included in the green growth (from energy efficiency with intellectual services and building refurbishment to local communities providing local services that reduce the demand for transport).

There are several environment-related sectoral strategic documents, including: the Spatial Development Strategy (2004), which provides guidelines for sustainable spatial planning and development at the national and local levels; the Environment and Agriculture Programme (2008), which sets priorities with respect to sustainable agriculture; the National Action Plan on Energy Efficiency for 2008-16 and the National Renewable Energy Action Plan 2010-2020 which set up targets and measures for achieving the EE and RES goals as defined with the EU climate and energy package; Operational Programme for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions by 2012 with the measures required to meet the Kyoto Protocol target, Action plan ‘Wood is beautiful’ – for increasing the competitiveness of the forest-wood chain in Slovenia by 2020, to connect wood-processing industries (June 2012); and the Rural Development Programme for 2007-13, which pays special attention to sustainable management of natural resources. A new National Energy Plan has been under preparation since 2010.

Among recent strategic documents, the following can be regarded as comprehensive sectoral strategies of sustainable development: Resolution on the strategic guidelines for the development of the Slovenian agriculture and food industry by 2020, 2012-2016 Slovenian Tourism Development Strategy, and the Slovenian Industrial Policy.

As a vision of the development of the Slovenian agriculture, Resolution on the strategic guidelines for the development of the Slovenian agriculture and food industry by 2020 "Securing the food for tomorrow" (Zagotovimo.si hranozajutri; March 2011) emphasizes sustainable agriculture, which he understands as interdependent and balanced development in the economic, social and environmental terms, and is therefore the main orientation of the strategic performance of agricultural policy.

2012-2016 Slovenian Tourism Development Strategy with the working name “The 2012-2016 Partnership for the Sustainable Development of Tourism” (June 2012) defines the 2016 vision and partnership commitment: “In 2016, tourism in Slovenia will be entirely based on sustainable development and will be, as a very successful industry of the national economy, a major contributor to our country’s social welfare and reputation in the world.” The sustainable concept of tourism development is highlighted in all areas and levels.

The purpose of the Slovenian Industrial Policy (SIP; February 2013) is to set the priorities for the development of industry and the economy for the period of the next financial perspective 2014-2020. The vision of SIP is to improve the business environment, to support entrepreneurship and innovation, and to develop promising technological and industrial areas that correspond to social challenges, in order to create the conditions for the continuous restructuring of existing industries into energetically, materially, environmentally and socially effective industries of knowledge and innovation, leading to longer-lasting and better employment opportunities, as well as increased integration in international business. New sources of growth are represented primarily by responses to social challenges with the introduction of a new paradigm of development, resulting from concepts of green growth (OECD), the green economy (UNEP) and a materially-efficient and low carbon society (EC), which are based on improving efficiency (energy, material, environmental and social) instead of relying on increasing consumption of space, raw materials and energy.

Partnership Agreement between Slovenia and the European Commission for the period 2014–2020 (PA) is a strategic document and the basis for drawing from EU funds. It covers all five EU funds governed by the Common Strategic Framework (European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), European Social Fund (ESF), Cohesion Fund (CF), European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) and European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF).

According to the proposal adopted by the Government of the Republic of Slovenia in July 2014: “The overview of Slovenia’s development in the past years shows that Slovenia’s shift from strategic objectives in economic, environmental and social areas during the on-going crisis was caused by the inadequate and inefficient implementation of key strategic policies. Against the backdrop of persistent crisis and significantly changed international conditions, Slovenia needs to reflect on a new, inclusive and sustainable development-oriented model that will equally take on board economic, environmental, social and cultural dimensions of development, and anticipated future challenges, while pursuing the EU 2020 Strategy development policies that underline the shift to a circular, low-carbon economy in terms of competitiveness and environmental awareness.”

PA defines the horizontal principle of sustainable development “as the central guiding principle in the preparation of programmes for the implementation of EU funds, whereby Slovenia will promote measures facilitating a shift to a low-carbon resource-efficient society that will provide prosperity for its citizens. Funding will target measures that enhance social cohesion, reduce poverty risk and strengthen social equality, while contributing to solutions that address demographic challenges. By investing in measures to raise the level of material and energy efficiency, climate change mitigation and adaptation and pollution prevention, the country seeks to ensure the long-term environmental sustainability of a society which respects its own culture and cultural heritage and recognises the richness of multi-culture.

The investments will pursue a principle of efficiency that strengthens the value of:

  • economic capital by increasing added value,
  • natural and cultural capital by enhancing environmental performance and the provision of ecosystem services while preserving natural resources and cultural features,
  • social capital by enhancing knowledge, creativity, innovation, civil society and efficiency of social services.”

 

 

 

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Evaluation and Review

The implementation of the NSDS is monitored in the form of a Development Report that is annually prepared by the Institute of Macroeconomic Analysis and Development and adopted by the Government of the Republic of Slovenia as a guideline for formulation of national economic and development policy. The Development Report 2008 contains findings regarding the implementation of strategic guidelines of the initial NSDS period, and the recent Development Reports present an overview and an assessment of the implementation of the strategy from its adoption up to the previous year, except in cases where the latest data are only available for earlier years. The recent Reports also comment on the implementation of the Europe 2020 goals (A European Strategy for Smart, Sustainable, and Inclusive Growth), to which Slovenia committed itself at the national level.

In 2013 and 2014 Reports, in interpreting the findings it is also taken into account that the economic crisis has shifted Slovenia (as well as the entire EU) away from a number of SDS objectives, which can therefore no longer be achieved in the short term. The analysis and findings thus primarily focus on developments since the outbreak of the crisis, including in comparison with other countries and the most recent EU-level guidelines.

The reports are divided into two parts: Part I presents an overview of the NSDS implementation for the five main objectives; part II documents the progress in detail by means of indicators of Slovenia's development.

Main findings of the 2012 Report:

  • In recent years Slovenia has been moving away from its strategic targets related to economic development and the welfare of the population and there have been no substantive shifts towards a sustainable reduction of the environmental burden.
  • The setback in development is a result of structural weaknesses of the economy and a significant deterioration in access to finance.
  • Economic and social conditions call for sustainable fiscal consolidation and laying sound foundations for a rebound of economic activity that will be more resilient to shocks and will facilitate job creation.

Main findings of the 2014 Report:

  • The year 2013 was marked by the implementation of some long-deferred structural reforms, as well as positive changes in the area of competitiveness and the first signs of economic recovery.
  • Despite changes seen over the last year, Slovenia’s setback in economic development since the beginning of the crisis is among the largest in the EU; the welfare of the population has also decreased substantially, and the reduction of environmental pressures continues to stem primarily from lower economic activity.
  • In order to revive economic growth and halt the decline in household welfare in the medium term, more radical structural changes will be necessary.

The OECD Environmental Performance Review for Slovenia, concluded in 2012, examined Slovenia’s framework for sustainable development and green growth, i.e.:

 

  • How the country has used public and private investment, supported by EU funds, to pursue environmental objectives. 
  • The use of economic instruments, the removal of fiscal benefits, environmental fees and charges, and subsidies that encourage environmentally friendly activities or reduce environmentally harmful impacts.
  • Eco-innovation performance.
  • Policies to encourage green corporate responsibility and investment, and green public procurement.

 

The relating Chapter 1 Towards Green Growth reviews progress in the period 2000-11. It also reviews progress with respect to the objectives of the 2001 OECD Environmental Strategy.

The overall assessment by the OECD EPR: “Despite the inclusion of environmental issues in these documents (i.e., documents cited in sections Basic information and Mechanisms of Horizontal Integration), implementation of the SDS and the NDP has not effectively integrated environmental considerations into economic development priorities. The main constraint has been compartmentalisation of planning and implementation within individual government agencies.”

 

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Indicators and Monitoring

Implementation of the SDS has been assessed on an annual basis. The findings in therecent Development Reports (e.g.Development Report 2014)are mainly based on the results obtained through the set of indicators that was designed to monitor development. The set of indicators largely corresponds to the set of 71 indicators applied in 2007, although it has been extended in some areas. The analysis in the Development Report 2014 is based on the official statistical data of domestic and foreign institutions that were available by the beginning of April 2014. In the analyses, a comparison of Slovenia with other EU Member States is made, and implementation of the Europe 2020 Strategy goals is examined.

In 2009, the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia (SORS) realized, under the international project with financial support from Eurostat, the idea of establishing a key set of national sustainable development indicators. One of the aims of the project was to improve the visibility and proper identification of the concept of sustainable development in Slovenia, i.e., to present the idea of sustainable development with a set of indicators in a non-technical way to the general public. The first set of sustainable development indicators was formulated at the workshop which was organized by SORS in April 2009. As the result of the project, the final set of indicators was grouped into three sections: well-being, balance and modesty, and intergenerational cooperation. Each field is described through environmental, economic and social aspects. The Sustainable Development Indicators for Slovenia are presented in a brochure published on 13 May 2010 and in its second – updated edition published on 29 November 2010. The document can be downloaded here.

The SD indicators are now also available in the SI-STAT Data Portal. Indicators were updated with the latest available data, mostly for 2010.

The OECD Environmental Performance Review for Slovenia presents and interprets data series for several SD indicators.

The full list(s) of indicators as identified by a study commissioned by Eurostat can be downloaded here:

 

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Participation

During the preparation of the NSDS, several workshops with the participation of various stakeholder groups discussed the drafts. The discussions, workshops and close inter-ministerial co-ordination resulted in the Draft Strategy that the Government adopted as the proposal for public debate. Public debate started with a consultation meeting held by the Prime Minister. The participants were representatives of business, science, culture and other social stakeholders. Moreover, the NCSD organised five topic-specific discussions with individual groups of societal stakeholders (employers, employees, non-governmental organisations, social activities, regional and local interests).

According to the Government decision of 14 June 2007, the Council for SD was composed of 34 members, comprising 9 representatives of government offices and 25 representatives of civil society (including representative of the economy, trade unions, municipalities, regional development agencies, the Roma community, Italian and Hungarian ethnic minorities, Slovene economic associations in Austria and Italy, and NGOs in the fields of environmental, social, economic development and equal opportunities). The nine members of the 2011 – 2012 Council for Sustainable Development were coming from NGO’s, academia, business sector, and local communities.

In preparation to review certain important strategic documents and policies in Slovenia (i.e. the Lisbon Implementation Strategy and the Slovenian Development Strategy, the latter is officially understood as NSDS), a participatory process was designed. The process started in May 2008 with a ‘scenario-building workshop’ involving about 30 participants to develop three scenarios for the future development of Slovenia with special focus on the impacts of climate change. This two-day workshop was organised by the Government Office for Climate Change and was attended by representatives of various governmental institutions, scientists, business representatives, unions, NGOs and the media. The current results are three scenarios regarding the future development of Slovenia and a definition of key actors, events and elements for each scenario. The experiences with the participatory process will be used for the review of the Slovenian Development Strategy in 2009.

The consultation process for the preparation of the strategy for the transition to a low-carbon society, led by the Government Office of Climate Change in 2011-2012, involved over 15 stakeholder workshops and conferences, with more than 250 participants from all relevant sectors. The preparation process for the workshops included also analyses of key stakeholders, mainly through in-depth research carried out in the framework of a PhD project. The following main actors were identified: NGOs, Chamber of Commerce and some of the enterprises of its board (other key stakeholders were from energy sector and low carbon technologies sector), Ministry of Environment and Spatial Planning, Ministry of Transport, Ministry of Finance, Prime Minister Cabinet, syndicates, local authorities, research institutions. The workshops participants actively contributed to the formulation of SWOT analysis, common vision, key goals and measures.

With the amendment to the Environmental Protection Act in June 2012, the Parliament abolished the Slovenian Council for Environmental Protection (CEPRS) as part of austerity measures to reduce the fiscal deficit.

Currently have neither the Government nor the Parliament no consultative body for sustainable development.

For a detailed documentation of all advisory and participatory councils (for SD and/or the environment) in this country, please go to the EEAC website at For a detailed documentation of all advisory and participatory councils (for SD and/or the environment) in this country, please go to the EEAC website at http://www.eeac.eu/councils/slovenia and click on one of the listed institutions. and click on one of the listed institutions.

 

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Sub-national activities

  • The competences and tasks of local authorities are determined by the Local Self-Government Act. Municipalities have regulatory and management functions with respect to provision of environmental services (e.g. water supply and sanitation, waste collection and disposal, protection against noise).
  • Municipal communities may also adopt their own environmental protection programmes, while larger urban communities are obliged to do so (The Environmental Protection Act, 2006).In 2007, the Ministry for Environment and Spatial Planning issued recommendations to the local municipalities for preparation of their environmental protection programmes. The document was designed in the participatoryprocess. 
  • In the Recommendations to the local municipalities in preparing local programmes for environmental protection the use of indicators at three levels are recommended:

          - The environmental indicators.
          - The indicators for the operational goals.
          - The indicators for monitoring the implementation of the measures.

  • As regards Local Agenda 21: according to the survey conducted in 2010 by the NGO Union of Environmental Movements of Slovenia (ZEG), almost 25 % of the participating local communities (46) had adopted guidelines or a programme for implementation of sustainable development.

 

 

 

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This Country Profile has been last updated on: Monday, 30 October 2017

For the sources used in the country profiles, please click here.

 

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